The Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time Original Soundtrack

Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time Original Soundtrack, The. Передняя обложка. Click to zoom.
Legend of Zelda Ocarina of Time Original Soundtrack, The
Передняя обложка
Composed by Кодзи Кондо
Arranged by Кодзи Кондо / Ёсико Кавамото
Published by Pony Canyon
Catalog number PCCG-00475
Release type Game Soundtrack - Official Release
Format 1 CD - 82 Tracks
Release date December 18, 1998
Duration 01:17:14
Genres
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Overview

With The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, Nintendo took its legendary franchise in a new direction. For the first time, the series would take place in a 3D, fully-rendered, real-time atmosphere. While there are those who despise this game (and others of this caliber which followed, notably Majora's Mask and The Wind Waker), Ocarina of Time was nevertheless a milestone for the series and one of the most successful games of all time.

The music, incidentally, took a similarly different direction for not just the series, but for game music in general. Most Nintendo-developed video game scores have been merely pleasant songs to hum while playing, but Koji Kondo wanted to bring the "interactiveness" of the latest addition to the forefront with his score. What resulted was arguably one of the most immense soundtracks to ever be created for the struggling Nintendo 64 — 82 tracks total!

Body

Ocarina of Time is probably the most ambitious and experimental of the Zelda scores in that it serves more as a musical accompaniment rather than music for its own sake. For example, the dungeon themes are not just eerie, brooding theme, but rather moody and ambient, with a touch of atmospheric sound effects in the background. However, some of the later dungeon songs are a little more musical and occasionally frightening. Such a particular track belongs to "Inside Ganon's Castle", which is three variations of "Ganondorf's Theme" performed by an organ. This makes for one of the most chilling and amazing renditions of the somewhat repetitive theme for Hyrule's nemesis. In addition, the "Hyrule Field Main Theme" (which will be discussed later) changes depending upon Link's actions, bright and adventurous when he's walking, dangerous and furious when he's battling monsters, and quiet and mellow when he's standing still.

This is not to say, however, that there aren't any musical tracks. On the contrary. The soundtrack offers a large number of new unforgettable songs, such as the carefree, childish "Kokiri Forest", the Western "Lon Lon Ranch", the Celtic "Market", the beautiful "Zora's Domain" (with a high-quality sounding guitar), and the rollicking "Gerudo Valley" (one of the soundtrack's many highlights). In addition, classic Zelda themes are recycled (rather well) for the game: "Zelda's Theme", "Great Fairy's Fountain", "Kakariko Village", "Master Sword", and "Ganondorf's Theme", all from The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. In addition, there is a very beautiful hint of the whistle motif from The Legend of Zelda (the first game) in the "Title Theme".

Arguably the most impressive of these tracks are the ones that feature choral vocals. These are tracks 16, 44, 48, 67, 74, 79, 80, and 82. "Temple Of Time" sounds like a deep male's chorus singing a Gregorian chant, while "Chamber Of The Sages" and "Legend Of Hyrule" feature a women's chorus singing celestial-sounding hymns (this works beautifully for the cinema scenes where we see Hyrule getting created). The full chorus is put to good use on the extremely exciting "Last Battle". Amidst the dreary, yet dangerous ode with a furious rolling snare drum in the background, the chorus sings along with it, creating a truly dazzling battle track.

Despite these ingredients, however, and even though there are many fans of the soundtrack, Ocarina of Time's music often receives unfair critical attack from some disgruntled purists - particularly because of its two glaring faults. The most outrageous of these drawbacks is the omission of a classic Zelda theme, the Overworld theme. I honestly didn't really believe that it would REALLY be excluded from the latest addition to the Zelda franchise, so I had to hear "Hyrule Field Main Theme" for my proof. In my opinion, is the Overworld theme missing from the soundtrack? The frustrated answer is yes and no. It is not played in the way it originally sounds in Zelda games, but it IS possible to hear at some points, a brief hint of the first couple of notes from the Overworld Theme. (Hey, a little bit of it is better than nothing!) Not that the new Overworld theme isn't any good. I actually liked it, and thought it suited perfectly to the game.

The only other reason why Ocarina of Time (and its two follow-ups) are despised by some is because it runs on a somewhat dated sound system. Most scores from Nintendo 64 games have gotten a bad (and sometimes undeserved) rap because the MIDI-sounding synthesis which makes up the orchestration of the music is sometimes lacking in comparison to the more superior CD-based systems. Even the chorus on the choral tracks sounds synthesized, unlike those on Final Fantasy VII's "One Winged Angel". The same thing, however, could never be said for "Fire Temple"; the choral vocals on this track sound EXACTLY like an actual Japanese male's chorus chanting and creates arguably one of the highlights of the soundtrack. Too bad it's cut short on the album, though. Oh, well... Yet what is amazing is how the instruments STILL sound great considering that they aren't up to the level of CD quality. The atmospheric sound effects, meanwhile, sound realistic and spectacular. What is really amazing about this is how Koji Kondo manages to toy around with the limitations of the N64's sound system and puts them to good use to churn out a spectacular soundtrack.

Summary

Flawless or not, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time's soundtrack deserves a special place in the history of game music and Nintendo soundtracks, and earns my highest recommendation. The sound system may be somewhat inferior to CD quality, but when reviewing soundtracks, it is important to evaluate them for what they are, not for what they aren't. Especially when there is much to enjoy, from exciting battle themes, to beautiful lullabies, to stirring choral tracks.

There is an interesting album release situation regarding the music. Nintendo has issued several albums of the music from the game on CDs, from rather lacking "Greatest Hits" compilations to a 72-minute album consisting only of 35 tracks. All albums share the same drawbacks as most domestic-released Nintendo soundtracks: cheap packaging and NO liner notes. The Japanese album produced by Pony Canyon (the distributor for ten N64 soundtracks around this time), by contrast, squeezes all 82 songs onto one CD, playing all of them once. Unfortunately, this causes some of the tracks to finish abruptly before they even play all the way through, much to the dismay of fans. Nevertheless, it still is probably the most *complete* soundtrack of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time to be around.

Its album situation aside, The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Original Soundtrack is an impressive achievement for Koji Kondo. Even though some continue to deride his recent efforts, his fans applaud his experiments and await his next projects. As one such fan, I rank this soundtrack as one of my favorites of all-time, recommending it with all my heart.



Album
9/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

Jon Turner

Overview

Anyone who's anyone in the gaming world knows of The Legend of Zelda. They may not like Zelda, and they may not have even played Zelda, but everyone knows the franchise. So, when it came time to review the OSTs for the various Zelda games, I thought carefully about them. It was important for me to review the ones I knew, because I could give a valid judgment of them. Ocarina of Time was the second Zelda game I have had a chance to play (Majora's Mask was my first), and sadly, it's also the one I wish I had in my gaming library, because I had a lot of fun with it. The music in the game is very... unique to the franchise, and is immediately identifiable even from just a few opening bars of a track. For this review, I'm going to focus on what I think are the strong points of the album — both what sounds good to me, and those tracks which are particularly strong additions to the OST as a whole. I'll also focus on these tracks in different groupings, so if you don't see me discussing a particular track right away, keep reading, as I may mention it later.

Body

Since this is the 'Ocarina of Time', it seems only natural to start with the Ocarina tracks. One thing that always amazes me when I hear the music from this game is the power and potential behind these otherwise overly simplistic tracks. Each is a short melodic phrase, barely ten notes long, yet they have such an impact on the game as a whole — not only by having Link play them in the game (to teleport to a location, or cause something to happen), but by having them form a musical connection between the player, and the people and places in the game. "Zelda's Lullaby" and "Epona's Song" are two such themes that create an important connection. "Zelda's Theme" continuously reminds the player and Link of what hangs in the balance should he fail in his quest. "Epona's Song" is the constant reminder that Link is not alone, and that his trusty steed will follow him always. These two themes have also appeared in other Zelda titles. "Saria's Song" and "Song of Time" each remind the player of specific purposes within the game. Saria's friendly tune for Link keeps him on edge, while the "Song of Time" embodies all of the power of the Temple of Time, the iconic location to allow Link to travel through time. "Sun Song" and "Song of Storms" aren't particularly intricate of detailed, but their purpose is obvious, and using them effectively in the game is part of what makes Zelda such an intricate, thought-provoking title. Sometimes, all you need is a little music to make the flowers grow.

Of course, as important as the Ocarina tracks are, there isn't a lot of musical substance to them. That's where their orchestral counterparts come into play. "Zelda's Theme" and "Lon Lon Ranch" bring those short melodic phrases into a new perspective. "Lon Lon Ranch" particularly gives a whole new side to Epona's theme. When we hear it, we understand that we're on a ranch, and more particularly, that we feel at home there and at peace, much like Link does in the game. "Zelda's Theme" of course, is one of those main themes of the game that shows up over and over, but I decided to include it here to contrast it with it's ocarina track. I'll talk a little more about it later on. "Lost Woods" brings in the quick nature of "Saria's Song," and adds a sense of playfulness to the track which embodies the childhood feelings of Saria and Link. "Temple of Time" however brings an epic, atmospheric tone that the ocarina track can't begin to imply. "Hyrule Field Morning Theme" and "Windmill Hut" also bring their own touch to the ideas of a clear day and a thunderstorm. While the ocarina tracks work well in establishing the themes, the orchestrated tracks are really needed to understand them from a larger point of view.

Keeping with the Ocarina themes, it's time to turn to the all-important 'elemental world' themes, meaning the temples Link visits to obtain the six required medallions in the game. Each theme does a great job of mimicking the style of it's location. "Minuet of Woods" sounds very forest-like, like you're relaxing under a deep green canopy. "Bolero of Fire" gives an impression of quick heated tempers. "Serenade of Water" gives the sensation of swimming with the dolphins. "Nocturne of Shadow" sounds like an eerie haunted house, with who knows what lurking around the corner. "Prelude of Light" offers hope and the promise of a brighter tomorrow. "Requiem of Spirit" hints at the afterlife, as both a paradise and a prison. One thing that I have always enjoyed about the Legend of Zelda, is that it does not shy away from using music as more than just background noise. Specifically incorperating musical terms into the titles of these pieces which Link learns are something that hasn't been seen in other games, and it is very refreshing to see.

Let's look at some of the locations in the game. For the most part, some of these tracks are very memorable, almost to the degree of some of the main themes of the game. "Kakariko Village" is very slow and drawn out, suggesting a laid back way of life consisting of farmers and simple tradesmen. The pleasant feel of the track is backed up by simple guitar chord progressions, with a harmonica melody and ocarina counter melody. "Goron City" is very tribal, with congas and odd sounding bongos offering a structures bass line to the otherwise melodic percussion, the perfect way to represent the Goron race. "Zora's Domain" is very light, and very... glassy in nature. You have that feel of actually being underwater, surrounded by shimmering coral and water canyons in a hundred shades of blue. "Gerudo Valley" is probably the one location track that everyone can easily identify. Perhaps one of the most ambitious tracks on the album, it's definitely one of the stronger tracks both in instrumentation, and atmosphere. Canyons automatically come to mind, while the instrumentation of guitars and trumpets back up the Spanish feel of the track.

No review would be complete without a good look at the two most well known Zelda themes. "Ocarina of Time" is another rendition of "Zelda's Theme," combining together both an ocarina solo (as seen in the Ocarina tracks), and the orchestral counterpart. And while it is a good track, I'm going to move away from it to get to the focus of this section. Everyone knows of Hyrule, and the main track of this album doesn't disappoint. "Hyrule Field Main Theme" brings the theme out blaring, with the strings, percussion, and trumpets that appear in almost every rendition of the theme. It's an upbeat track that brings together all four corners of this album. Short ocarina melodic lines imitate the ocarina tracks; long melodic sections mimic the orchestral ocarina counterparts; tense, short sections of minor keys and dissonance hint towards the battle themes which occur throughout the game (which I didn't discuss in this review); and the strong single melodic portions in the latter half of the track bring together the area themes from the game. This track is a perfect example of how to really 'represent' an album, or in this case, a franchise.

Summary

It may appear to you that I am in favor of this album. To be completely honest, while I respect the ingenuity of some of the tracks, as well as the unique presence this franchise has in the video game world, I'm not a huge fan of this album as a stand-alone experience. A lot of the instrumentation, white noteworthy, is simply too... simple to deserve any real praise. Also, as most of the tracks clock in at less than two minutes, it's hard to really justify one track as being superior to others, when nothing is really expanded upon other than one melodic line. While the tracks are memorable, that's all they are. I can't see myself sitting and listening to one of the ocarina tracks over and over again, simply because it's far too easy to remember after one playback, to the point where you don't need to hear it again to enjoy it. The melodies are to die for, but that's all. So, while I approve of the album as a statement, I can't recommend it as a purchase for anyone other than a die-hard Zelda fan.



Album
7/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

Andre Marentette

Overview

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is one of the most commercially and critically successful video games ever made. Taking Zelda to the third dimension, it delighted with its entertaining free roaming gameplay, intricate presentation of Hyrule, epic storyline, and a score successful on a number of levels. Koji Kondo's soundtrack was particularly impressive because of how it interpreted Hyrule's geography, races, legends, and threatened existence through diverse means without the loss of the wider individuality and unity required to reflect the alien fantasy world of Hyrule as a whole. Let's take a closer look...

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The world of young Link is usually characterised by an outwardly positive vibe. "Kokiri Forest" delightfully portrays the childish nature of the fairy folk inhabiting Link's homeland; the theme's crisply phrased melodies are whimsically passed from one instrument to the next in almost dance like fashion above thin but buoyant accompaniment. The initial section of "Lost Woods" — simplistic, sparse, and repetitive — is so inherently happy and hummable that it strongly indicates it was created by Saria, one of the Kokiris; in fact, it was more likely conceived by Kondo in the bath, who also offers a gorgeously elaborate development section. Youthfulness is still evident outside the forest. For example, the bright melodies of the Celtic "Market" suitably represent a shoppers gathering in the country, while the jazzy nature of "Hyrule Castle Courtyard" reflects the fun of somewhat carelessly sneaking around. "Kakariko Village" is calm, laidback, and reassuring, beautifully arranged from A Link to the Past in both of its incarnations here. "Lon Lon Ranch" offers a similar feel while referencing the country music of vocalists like Emmylou Harris; it features synth vocals intended to represent the songstress Malon that are incredibly soothing despite their sound quality. There's also an array of more trivial but still charming themes used in various buildings, for instance "House", "Shop", "Shooting Gallery", and "Windmill Hut". And who could forget the theme of Kepora Gebora, Link's winged teacher? Here, Kondo's lyricism really shines, as he represents the owl's wise, inquisitive, and caring nature.

The racial diversity of Hyrule is evident throughout the soundtrack. The watery home, grace, pride, and reverence of the Zoras is reflected in "Zora's Domain", one of the finest examples of a variety of styles of music blended into one piece; Kondo combines Caribbean percussion, ethereal synth pads, and the distinctive tones of an acoustic guitar effortlessly to give a unique sound. Also wonderful is the representation of the friendly rock-eating giants, the Goron; the theme is almost entirely percussion based, but surprisingly catchy and groovy, made particularly original by the imitated sound of a DJ scratching on a turntable. The most popular theme on the soundtrack is "Gerudo Valley", used to represent the desert home of the Gerudo, a tribe of women thieves. With its flamenco beat, unforgettable melody, and Spanish flair, it's simply irresistible. The centrepiece of the score, the "Hyrule Field Main Theme", provides an overall representation of Link's adventure despite the vastness of Hyrule. This wondrous synth orchestral composition subtly samples a variety of themes from previous Zelda games, including the traditional Zelda overworld music, creating a soaring and adventurous composition. The melodic references were too subtle for some, who complained about the loss of tradition, but the theme excellently complements the setting of Hyrule nonetheless. It also wonderfully adapts to it: the break of dawn results in the theme being introduced by the serene morning theme, the approach of an enemy leads to an increase in dynamic and a transition into an aggressive and percussive section, coming to a standstill results in the music becoming more slowly phrased, and the approach to dusk results in the theme becoming progressively calmer and quieter before fading into nothingness.

Creation of the ocarina themes was a massive challenge to Koji Kondo, given he was limited to using just five notes, but the result of his efforts is nothing of outstanding. The melodies themselves are memorable and inspired. They form the basis of six sophisticated and individually characterised orchestrations in the case of the elemental dungeon themes, representing life, fire, water, darkness, spirit, and light. Those that are not dungeon-specific are presented as solo ocarina melodies that each provide the background for a more substantial setting theme. Kondo pairs "Saria's Song" and "Lost Woods", "Song of Storms" and "Windmill Hut". "Epona's Song" and "Lon Lon Ranch", "Sun's Song" and the morning theme, and "Song of Time" and "Temple of Time". An anomaly is "Zelda's Lullaby", which is the only ocarina theme derived from another score, A Link to the Past, and the only one not arranged for use in a specific location. It is used as a character theme ("Zelda's Theme"), an event theme ("Meet Again Zelda"), and, finally, symbolically ("Ocarina of Time") before the end credits medley appears. Given the game's title and the extent of the ocarina's integration into the game's score, mythology, storyline, and gameplay, it was essential that Kondo got it right, and indeed he did; the ocarina themes and their arrangements sound excellent from a musical, technological, and layman's perspective and the ocarina is wonderfully integrated into the story and gameplay.

Despite its title, Ocarina of Time still remains a tale of good against evil. The storyline is dominated by how Hyrule is threatened and eventually dominated by the megalomaniac warlord Ganandorf. The soundtrack reflects his threat immediately after the beautiful "Title Theme" with two dire cues: "Enter Ganandorf", 13 seconds worth of uncompassionate dissonance, and "Deku Tree", a sorrowful theme reflecting Ganondorf's curse on the doomed father of Kokiri forest. Half way through the soundtrack, a fully-fledged arrangement of "Ganondorf's Theme" from A Link to the Past is presented. This is the most potent musical symbol of the game's biggest turning point, when Ganondorf usurps the throne, seizes the Triforce, and wreaks multiple disasters upon Hyrule. Who could forget emerging from the Temple of Time as Adult Link following these events only to see Hyrule Market has been taken over by zombies and, in place of Hyrule Castle, there now floated a dark tower surrounded by lava? Also integral to the storyline are the various themes associated with the legends behind the Sacred Realm, the Hero of Time, and the Triforce. Synthesized choral samples are responsible for the sacred aura inherent to "Legend of Hyrule" and "Chamber of the Sages", while Gregorian chant colours the symbolic modal melody used in "Temple of Time". Also unforgettable is the solo harp theme of "Sheik", used to represent a supposed incarnation of the agile and mystical Sheikah tribe. It flows through a series of impressionistic chord progressions with incredible elegance and, despite being simple and repetitive, never grows old.

At Shigeru Miyamoto's request, Kondo made Zelda's dungeon themes very ambient in nature. They all boast amazing timbres, atmospheric qualities, and development. "Inside Jabu-Jabu's Belly", for instance, integrates electronica and gruesome sound effects to represent fluids, noises, bubbles, and pulsation inside a giant fish gut. "Shadow Temple", on the other hand, relies on drums, atmospheric noises, and distorted vocals to represent a spooky and dynamic environment. "Ice Cavern" and "Water Temple" interpret two different states of water through extensive use of tuned percussion. Perhaps best of all, "Spirit Temple" is centred around the unpredictable wails of an ethnic flute; this is genuinely emotional to listen to and emphasises the holy but primitive nature of the Egyptian-influenced temple. A few of the dungeon themes are trimmed down, however. The most significant victim is "Fire Temple"; with a playing time of 0:42, the awesome chanting section is discluded, though perhaps for cultural reasons, given some Muslims complained that it was inspired by Islamic prayer call. Unfortunately, the action themes are not especially remarkable, at least relative to most RPG soundtracks. They are generic, predictable, and similar, though represent activity well enough and are not without their individual quirks; for example, "Middle Boss Battle" is based on the chord progressions of "Ganondorf's Theme". Talking of which, the final dungeon theme is an organ arrangement of the same theme used when climbing Ganon's tower. Given Ganondorf himself is represented as the organist, the theme becomes increasingly louder and more elaborate as gamers approach his quarters. The final battle theme is an epic and emotional affair — slow-paced, melodic, thickly textured, and driven by rapid drums. It's a delicious piece of music that is well worth revisiting.

The most significant problem with the score is its presentation in album form. 82 tracks are squeezed on to one disc featuring 78 minutes of audio. This contrasts massively to the limited but moderately impressive domestic release of the album, which held 35 tracks and 72 minutes of audio. As a consequence, most tracks in the Japanese release of the album do not loop, which is sometimes to the benefit of the of the disc, given individual pieces rarely grow boring, though is often disappointing too. In addition to limiting the development of dungeon themes, an alternative rendition of "Lon Lon Ranch" was omitted, where an ocarina, as opposed to synthesized voice, interprets the lush melody. In order to hear the 'entire' score of Ocarina of Time independently of the game, it's necessary to buy this soundtrack, the domestic soundtrack, and 'The Lost Cuts' European album, but is it worth it? Not really. Loops, dungeon themes, and ocarina interpretations are nice to have, but not worth buying two other difficult-to-obtain albums for. That said, another criticism with the Japanese soundtrack is that it is quite an abrupt experience in places. This is partly due to most tracks not exceeding a minute, though the considerable stylistic fluidity of Kondo's creations means most tracks flow well to the next. The main culprit are the various fanfares and one-time event themes. For example, immediately after the delightful "Kokiri Forest", three fanfares dedicated to item discovery interrupt the flow of the adventure. Straight after, the soundtrack goes on a bit of a tangent dedicated to shopping, battles, the Deku tree, and guess what? Even more fanfares. The low point of the soundtrack is four very similar and slightly annoying pieces dedicated to horse racing presented in succession. Certainly, some sort of music effects collection at the end of the soundtrack would have been better than a near-endless number of interruptions. Nevertheless, this soundtrack is still the definitive purchase.

Summary

Criticisms with the album itself aside, Koji Kondo's score to The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is a masterpiece. Its melodies are gold, its diversity is impressive, and a near-perfect balance is achieved between continuity and change. The overall score manages to be a fluid and captivating accompaniment and to a revolutionary game, an adequate support to action, events, and the storyline, and an excellent representation of the scenery and dungeons of Hyrule. The soundtrack will appeal most to those who have played the game, given it brings so much nostalgia with it, but this ought not significantly undermine its worth and pleasantness as a stand-alone musical creation. I highly recommend it.



Album
9/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

Chris Greening

Overview

After many mediocre domestic CDs from Nintendo, such as Yoshi's Story, Diddy Kong Racing, and Banjo-Kazooie, how about another domestic Nintendo CD? No? Well, I don't blame you. But even if The Legend Of Zelda Ocarina of Time Soundtrack CD isn't enough to change your mind, it's definitely more worth checking out than those other efforts.

Body

Now I'm sure you all know that The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, the game, is nothing short of spectacular. Well, the same thing is true for this soundtrack, which is no surprise, considering that it's by Nintendo's main music man, Koji Kondo. As a matter of fact, it reminds me of Kondo's Super Mario 64, as well as Legend (the film score by Jerry Goldsmith). In Super Mario 64, Kondo took advantage of classic nostalgic Mario tunes and upgraded them to the next level, along with creating new themes. Well, with Ocarina of Time, he takes advantage of classic Zelda themes and upgrades them to the next level, and also creates new songs, which is just fine. For example, listen closely to "Title Theme". The whistle motif is masterfully incorporated into the music.

And what about the famous "Overworld" theme... is it used in here? Well, yes and no. Once or twice, the first couple of notes from the "Overworld" theme appear in "Hyrule Field Main Theme", but that's just about all that you get from the "Overworld" theme. That's a tad disappointing, but don't let that discourage you, there's plenty of excellent stuff on here. In fact, some tracks like "Ocarina Of Time" and "Kakariko Village" will definitely bring back more memories of playing Zelda games of the past... particularly The Legend Of Zelda: A Link to the Past.

Ocarina Of Time is like Legend in that it isn't just a musical score to go along in the background, but more like a true musical accompaniment. In "Hyrule Field Main Theme", the mood of the music changes from happy to suspenseful and so on. The way it literally shifts gears is absolutely stunning. The sound system sounds a bit like the one that was used for Star Fox 64. The instruments aren't exactly orchestra quality, but then, I didn't have much of a problem with it in that score and I don't have a problem with it here.

There are a total of 35 tracks on this album (only 29 are listed, the other six are bonus tracks), unlike Nintendo's other releases, which had about 15 tracks or so. Plus, the CD runs for a lengthy 72:10, whereas Yoshi's Story and Diddy Kong Racing both ran at only 30-39 minutes. However, not all the music from the game is featured here. The dungeon themes, "Goron City", and "Sheik's Theme" are among those not included. While there are some disappointed absences, the soundtrack improves upon the Japanese release in some ways by removing all the filler fanfares and actually looping the tracks. The dungeon themes weren't for all either.

Summary

After a bunch of disappointing CD releases, Nintendo has finally learned its lesson. It's not for everyone due to the absences but will appeal to a certain audience; those looking for the 'best' tracks. However, if you're a completist, the Japanese version is more recommended.



Album
7/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

Jon Turner

Album was composed by Кодзи Кондо and was released on December 18, 1998. Soundtrack consists of tracks with duration over more than hour. Album was released by Pony Canyon.

CD 1

1
Title Theme
01:20
2
Enter Ganondorf
00:13
3
Deku Tree
00:36
4
Fairy Flying
00:23
5
House
00:36
6
Kokiri Forest
01:01
7
Open Treasure Box
00:10
8
Item Catch
00:04
9
Small Item Catch
00:05
10
Shop
01:08
11
Battle
01:07
12
Inside the Deku Tree
01:27
13
Boss Battle
01:19
14
Boss Clear
00:13
15
Heart Container Get
00:05
16
Legend of Hyrule
01:58
17
Spiritual Stone Get
00:16
18
Fairy Ocarina Get
00:11
19
Hyrule Field Main Theme
04:43
20
Kepora Gebora's Theme
01:00
21
Market
00:59
22
Shooting Gallery
00:39
23
Hyrule Castle Courtyard
00:53
24
Enter Zelda
00:06
25
Ocarina
00:12
26
Zelda's Theme
00:49
27
Ocarina
00:09
28
Lonlon Ranch
02:08
29
Mini Game
00:32
30
Kakariko Village
01:44
31
Ocarina
00:07
32
Hyrule Field Morning Theme
00:37
33
Goron City
01:38
34
Ocarina
00:09
35
Lost Woods
00:39
36
Dodongo's Cavern
00:46
37
Middle Boss Battle
01:07
38
Dinosaur Boss Battle
01:08
39
Zora's Domain
01:30
40
Great Fairy's Fountain
00:35
41
Potion Shop
00:52
42
Inside Jabu-Jabu's Belly
00:34
43
Ocarina
00:12
44
Temple of Time
01:19
45
Open Door of Temple of Time
00:15
46
Master Sword
00:13
47
Ganondorf's Theme
00:41
48
Chamber of the Sages
01:43
49
Medal Get Fanfare
00:14
50
Sheik's Theme
00:30
51
Horse Race
00:46
52
Horse Race Goal
00:05
53
Ingo's Theme
00:39
54
Escape from Lonlon Ranch
00:09
55
Kakariko Village Orchestra Version
01:44
56
Ocarina
00:07
57
Windmill Hut
00:52
58
Minuet of Woods
00:17
59
Forest Temple
01:52
60
Bolero of Fire
00:20
61
Fire Temple
00:42
62
Ice Cavern
00:45
63
Serenade of Water
00:19
64
Water Temple
01:44
65
Nocturne of Shadow
00:23
66
Prelude of Light
00:18
67
Shadow Temple
01:45
68
Gerudo Valley
01:34
69
Spirit Temple
02:57
70
Requiem of Spirit
00:24
71
Kotake & Koume's Theme
00:52
72
Meet Again Zelda
00:51
73
Game Over
00:09
74
Ganon's Castle Bridge
00:22
75
Ganon's Castle Under Ground
00:53
76
Inside Ganon's Castle
03:26
77
Ganondorf Battle
01:12
78
Escape from Ganon's Castle
00:33
79
Last Battle
02:10
80
Seal of Six Sages
00:29
81
Ocarina of Time
00:32
82
End Credits
07:08
30.04.12
  STATISTICS
  • Average album rating: 10.0 (2)
  • Page views: 24546
  • Album achieved 641 place in our Hall of Fame
  • 2 persons have this album in collection

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