FINAL FANTASY VII Original Sound Track [Limited Edition]

FINAL FANTASY VII Original Sound Track  [Limited Edition]. Front. Click to zoom.
FINAL FANTASY VII Original Sound Track [Limited Edition]
Front
Composed by Нобуо Уэмацу
Arranged by Нобуо Уэмацу
Published by DigiCube
Catalog number SSCX-10003
Release type Game Soundtrack - Official Release
Format 4 CD - 85 tracks
Release date February 10, 1997
Duration 04:34:13
Genres
Rate album!

Overview

We know that this is the Original Soundtrack that accompanies possibly one of the most famous games in history, but a question remains in the back of everybody's mind. Can this be another ground-breaking soundtrack that fits alongside the game perfectly and wows its listeners?

Well, in the short answer, yes! The music that accompanies the name "Final Fantasy" has always been a major talking point in all of the previous games, due to the sumptuous melodies and brilliant backing in literally all of the themes that Nobuo Uematsu composes. And this one is no different. Uematsu amazes us once again with his large range of styles and his fantastic knowledge of world cultures with this soundtrack, and when these two aspects are put together there is only one outcome. A truly masterful piece of work that meets all our expectations and manages to make us wonder what he will bless our ears with next time around.

Body

The first piece of music that you hear in the actual game, "Opening ~ Bombing Mission," really sets the scene; it has pretty much everything needed to make it a memorable track. Both the FMV sequence and its accompanying music start out very mysteriously, and then the scene pans out to a wide view of the city. It changes to a more triumphant tone when the Final Fantasy VII logo comes up before going straight into a fast-paced tension-building sequence. This piece has everything that you would expect the beginning of a game to have, especially when you don't know anything about who you are or what you are doing there.

The soundtrack is considerably influenced at the beginning of the game by industrial music and many thought this would be an interesting move, since Nobuo had never really composed that style of music for a game of this format. This doesn't mean that every piece of music uses synthesisers and an analog drum kit. If it did, then it wouldn't be half the soundtrack that it is. The industrial theme is used where it is needed, in some of the setting themes and fighting themes like the rock-influenced classic "Still More Fighting," but pretty much as soon as you leave the city of Midgar everything in the musical aspect of the game changes. It certainly becomes a lot calmer and Nobuo really starts to use his brilliant composing skills. I'm not saying that the industrial music is bad, because it certainly isn't and pieces like "Mako Reactor" and "Shinra Company" really stand out as true classics. I just feel that Uematsu is much better at composing calmer orchestral-influenced material.

As soon as you leave the city of Midgar, you hear the brilliant "F.F.VII Main Theme." For me this piece really outlines the game. It is cased in uncertainty with it changing between the major and minor keys all the time. You aren't sure what the piece of music holds but you hope it will all turn out good in the end. This piece does use repetition in a very good way since every time the same chord scheme is repeated it just sounds better than the last, and it really makes you just want to stand still on the world map just so you can hear it. It certainly makes you curse those random battles, when it interrupts you at a key part of the theme, that's for sure.

The music in the rest of the game changes theme depending on where you are, ranging from the oriental feel of "Wutai" to the militaristic "Fortress of the Condor." In every aspect of culture, Uematsu has put a set theme in his mind and he has composed a brilliant piece of music to accompany the setting. Some would argue that Square wanted to test his compositional skill on this project, due to the extensive change that's seen in the game. The game certainly tested him more than any previous Final Fantasy instalment. Uematsu has outdone everything previous and has proved to the critics that he is much greater than he was previously rated. He only seems to get better and better the more he composes.

Obviously, the music from Final Fantasy VII is going to be compared to its predecessors in terms of sound quality and composition style. And due to the increased sound capabilities of the PlayStation, Uematsu has had a largely increased view about how he composes his music. The quality of the sounds he has used are far superior to that on the Super Nintendo, with noticeable changes being the increased quality of the stringed instruments, and I feel that this has been utilised very well. More of the pieces in Final Fantasy VII use stringed instruments than in previous Final Fantasy games and I think this aided the overall tone of the soundtrack. They are also used in much more depth with many layers of harmony making up each piece and there is a good structure of panning used. A very good example of this is "Highwind Takes to the Skies." This piece is largely based on stringed instruments with some electronic overtones, and it works amazingly well. It is a memorable tune that you will probably never forget, and it has the type of melody that you just want to go to your instrument and play.

Summary

The Final Fantasy VII soundtrack is clearly in a league of its own. It excels in quantity, quality, and pure epic scale. Every piece is individual, and every piece has its own meaning. For me, when I listen to each theme a different part of the magical story is being told. I'm not saying that you should definitely go out and buy it, because without the game it just isn't as special. Having said that, though, it is still a brilliant selection of music when listened to without images to accompany the sounds. If you are a die hard Final Fantasy fan, then I would recommend looking into the purchase of this soundtrack, because you will definitely like it. If you aren't, then play the game and then buy it because I guarantee that it will win you over.



Album
9/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

Jared Smith

Overview

Final Fantasy VII is widely considered a classic of the RPG genre, still occupying a space of renown ten years after its release. Similarly, Nobuo Uematsu's soundtrack for the game has gained wide recognition: "One Winged Angel" and "Aerith's Theme" are some of his best known works, familiar to the most casual of VGM listeners. But is the soundtrack's popularity due to its association with the beloved game, or can it stand on its own as an artistically successful work?

Body

First, a general description of the soundtrack is in order, for those not familiar with it already. Nobuo Uematsu has composed a primarily orchestral score. Most of the game's music could be transcribed without much effort for a traditional symphony orchestra. However, as is characteristic in the Final Fantasy series and in Uematsu's work, more futuristic, synthetic sound patches are used as well. Many of the battle themes, such as "J-E-N-O-V-A" or "Birth of God" have clear influences from the electronica and rock genres, with instrumentations to match. There is also a moderate jazz influence. Many harmonies used in tracks depicting urban areas have their chords supplemented with added 6ths, 7ths, 9ths, and the like. However, though Uematsu draws inspiration from other genres, this is still a primarily classical mainstream soundtrack.

The first thing the casual listener will notice about the soundtrack is the use of the primitive synthesizer technology of 1997. Indeed, it is difficult to ignore this even after thorough examination of the album. Because Uematsu has employed MIDI instead of samples, the number of patches used is actually fairly few. The string sounds used in "Steal the Tiny Bronco!", "A Secret, Sleeping in the Deep Sea", and "Anxious Heart", just to name a few, are all identical, despite the differing moods of these tracks. Through a working knowledge of compositional techniques, Uematsu manages to create a variety of different moods despite limited orchestral potential. The small number of sound patches used also gives the soundtrack a very distinctive mood and feel. Because we are continually subjected to precisely the same string section, we start to recognize it as the Final Fantasy VII string section. For those listeners who've played the game, this association has likely already formed, which results in a soundtrack that captures well the spirit of the game, easily evoking nostalgia for events in the game's plot.

Despite this, however, the fact still remains that, compared to what we're used to hearing in synthesized soundtracks, Final Fantasy VII falls appallingly short. And though this is partly a sign of how advanced synthesizer operation is today, there is evidence contained within the soundtrack that on the majority of it, Uematsu could have done a vastly better job. Uematsu has been cited as saying he used MIDI sounds for the Original Soundtrack instead of higher quality samples because he wanted the load times in the game to be faster. While this is a perfectly admirable explanation, the fact remains that for most of the soundtrack the poor sound quality is a significant detractor to his work. The instruments, instead of sounding delightfully retro, are just close enough to the real thing to remind us what we're missing, making listening to most tracks an inherently frustrating experience. "Racing Chocobos - Place Your Bets" is one of the most fun pieces on the album simply because it is unapologetically primitive in its sound. But on the opposite side of things, there are the rare tracks like "Sandy Badlands" that succeed because the patches used are comparatively close to the actual instruments.

Some patches sound markedly better than others. Consider the two tracks "Flowers Blooming in the Church" and "Aerith's Theme". Both are renditions of the same melody, played on two different instruments, programmed with two different patches. The flute melody in "Flowers..." sounds jerky and unmusical: what others might call a case in point for why true artistic music cannot be produced on a synthesizer. Comparatively, the same motive played on the piano in "Aerith's Theme" is sensitive and gentle. Why is there such a huge difference? The clunky repetitiveness of the bell ostinato in "Flowers" has a bit to do with it, but the primary reason lies in the nature of the patches. The MIDI flute, true to the actual instrument, does not decay gradually with time. Thus, there is no dynamic variation in the melody, giving it a very forced, artificial feel. By contrast, the MIDI piano, like the real thing, stops sounding after a certain length of time. And subsequently, "Aerith's Theme" comes to life, gaining a third dimension. By looking at whether they decay or not, and comparing that to our expectation of the sound created from real life experiences, we can divide Uematsu's sound patches into 'good' and 'bad' categories. In the first go piano, bells, nonmelodic percussion, harp, and techno-styled synth instruments. In the second go woodwinds, brass and strings. Other patches are used occasionally throughout the soundtrack (electric guitar and solo fiddle come to mind) but because of their relative novelty their presence is more easily tolerated.

There is another, less noticeable factor besides decay that plays a factor in how melodic a patch sounds. In "Flowers Blooming in a Church", the flute melody is such that we can hear the attack on each note, which creates a very jerky, stilted sound. Similar problems affect the acoustic guitar in "On the Other Side of the Mountain" and "The Nightmare's Beginning", which gives both tracks a static, unmoving air. Though Uematsu's ensemble string sound generally doesn't decay, the nature of its tone is such that it is fairly inoffensive. Thus, string-heavy tracks like "On That Day, Five Years Ago" can be quite tuneful, with the help of a good motive. And besides strings, there are more patches with a smoother, less offensive articulation of attack. They tend to be instruments with deeper, mellower textures: the whistles used in "Sandy Badlands" and "Don of the Slums", the accordion used in "Chasing the Black-Caped Man", and the clarinet and supporting winds used in "Debut". But regrettably, these exceptions to the rule still make up the minority of the 'bad' patches. There are still plenty of pieces marred by piercing, inelegant synth.

And that same piercing, inelegant synth could have been fixed. "Anxious Heart" is one of the most beautiful pieces on the soundtrack, featuring a warm, lush string sound playing a series of aching chords to depict an evening in the Midgar slums. It manages to accomplish beauty and emotion, despite strings being on the 'bad' list of patches. Uematsu achieves this by more than by virtue of the string patch's gentle attack; he is able to add dramatic crescendos and decrescendos to add poignancy to the mellow string sound. Yet later on the in same track, when the strings are relegated to the background while a harp plays, the same patch is used but the dynamics are dropped. They aren't needed; the strings are no longer at the forefront of the ensemble. Yet it makes one wonder: why couldn't the same care be taken to program in dynamics on other tracks? Perhaps the answer is yet again that Uematsu wanted to simplify his pieces and favor loading times over sound quality, but one must draw the bar somewhere. The soundtrack clearly lacks for dynamics, and it is frustrating to know that they were available but not used to their full extent.

But despite all my complaints, Uematsu manages to keep poor sound quality from completely overwhelming the album. He uses a variety of tricks throughout the album to hide the limits of MIDI programming, and it's no surprise that the tracks he applies these to most are the ones considered favorites today.

Layering of melodic voices is one such method he uses. In "Shinra Company", the sinister ascending melody is played by a quavering wind instrument, doubled (very softly, but with great effectiveness) by a string section. This doubling gives the whole piece a fuller, more realistic sound, without having to employ any dynamics. The same technique is used again in this track, when brass instruments harmonize with a synthesized choir in repeated replies to the main melody. Despite the individual weakness of both patches, they come together to make a cohesive, full sound. But simple harmonization alone is not enough: two separate colors are needed. Consider the repeated ostinato in "Mining Town", which is made up of two winds playing together in fifths. Despite the added voice, it still falls flat, bringing the whole track down with it. Were an instrument of a different timbre, perhaps a harp, to be added, I'm sure the piece would improve immensely. Similarly, in "Tifa's Theme", a solo flute is complemented with just bell arpeggios. Without added bulk to the sound, the track comes off as pale and weak. When string chords are added in the background, the overall presence of the melody improves immensely.

Similarly, those tracks which have more instrumental voices tend to sound better. Thus, "Chasing the Black-Caped Man", despite its unapologetic use of solo, un-delaying accordion, is still an interesting and dynamic piece. The interlocking bell and harp parts combined with string and choir drones create a lush atmosphere over which even a kazoo would sound good. "Still More Fighting" and many of the other battle themes feature tightly interlocking drumkits, ostinatos, bass parts and melodies. The busyness of these tracks are their virtue, with thick harmonies taking the place of a layered melody.

Another way Uematsu overcomes his poor sound quality is by increasing the tempo. Thus, most of the battle tracks are exempt from my complaints. "Fighting", for instance, is orchestrated with many of the same patches which other, more ponderous tracks stumble over: brass, strings. and woodwinds are the meat and potatoes of this exiting track. Yet because the melodies go by so quickly, we don't have time to notice the artificiality of their delivery. Additionally, the problem of note decay is not as evident simply because the notes are spaced closer together. Also in this category is one of the most dramatic tracks on the album, "The Countdown Begins". The fast string ostinato is so effective at introducing the track because it manages to evade the problem of sound quality, which in turn highlights its thematic elements.

Another element used on both the aforementioned tracks is orchestral crescendo. Instead of programming in an authentic crescendo into each separate voice, Uematsu gradually adds voices as the track goes along to build excitement. The difficulty of using this technique in video game music is that because looping is an essential part of the track, it's difficult to pull off anything too dramatic for fear that it will not be easy to return the track to its initial level of tension. But tracks like "The Countdown Begins", "Steal the Tiny Bronco!", and especially the triumphant "Opening" show that Uematsu is capable of using this technique to its fullest. And in "Fighting", a traditional looping piece, he uses a series of small orchestral crescendos in conjunction with upward scales to build and release tension throughout the track.

Of course, sometimes a great beat is all you need. Frequently, Uematsu supports an already excellent tune with a solid, well-composed drum track. Because percussion instruments are on my list of 'good' patches, a decent drum part can contribute towards offsetting otherwise poor MIDI instruments. "Birth of God" shines because of the backbeat kick on the snare drum, which adds momentum and excitement to every measure (though the rocking organ part doesn't hurt). Uematsu's intricate percussion may not turn "Turk's Theme" into a masterpiece, but it certainly makes the track less skippable. And the tribal drums in "Cosmo Canyon" lend a great deal to the overall atmosphere.

Finally, on top of it all, Uematsu can write a catchy motive. The melody of "Cid's Theme" is so heroic and inspiring, one might be forgiven for getting the impression of a crescendo from the upward-turning phrasing. It takes a second listen to realize that this track is no different from many others. The illusion of dynamics is no substitute for the real thing, eventually leaving the listener bored and frustrated with the flat, inexpressive MIDI sounds. Still, it's commendable that Uematsu could create such an illusion at all, and in context it's often the best we can hope for. A similar effect is created in the noble "Judgement Day". We are so inspired by the beautiful melody that it is extremely easy to imagine up one's own dynamics.

Unfortunately, there is an opposite end to this spectrum. Insipid tracks like "Gold Saucer" show that the ugliest melody cannot be prettied up with tricks to hide bad sound quality. Despite the fast tempo and the busy layered harmonies, the track is still wholly unappealing. The simple reason for this is that sound quality is not the be all and end all of musical quality. It certainly helps to have it — quite a lot, in my opinion — but it is ultimately just one factor of a whole, the other part of which includes compositional and thematic merit.

Subsequently, there are many tracks on the soundtrack lacking in compositional merit. The most obvious offenders are those tracks consisting of a single motive draped over a simple uninspired ostinato. "Infiltrating Shinra Building", for example, is nothing but the 7-note motive heard in "Shinra Company" accompanied by long string chords with a repeated drum lick added shortly into the track. Though thematically, it makes sense in game for this motive to be used, it gets very old very fast when it's on its own. There are many other tracks that have this problem: "Red XIII's Theme", "Buried in the Snow", and "Off the Edge of Despair" are just three. Though they may have redeeming qualities, for the most part there is nothing there thematically that couldn't be summed up in a quarter of the time or less.

Sometimes, however, this thematic repetitiveness is used to great effect. Those who have played the game benefit most from this, as they have associations with the more prominent themes and motives used. "Those Chosen By the Planet" is used in the game as the villain's theme. To me it creates a very sinister and ominous tone, evocative of the evil Sephiroth, whose power is matched only by the mystery surrounding him. And when the main chromatic motive is used briefly in fast-paced pieces such as "Weapon Raid" or "Birth of God", it lends them that same sinister air by evoking the same image. Whether the effect is as dramatic for those unfamiliar with the game's characters and events is doubtful, but I can't imagine that there is no effect at all.

In many of the examples I've cited, Uematsu is using more than one compositional technique: adding a drum beat to an orchestral crescendo, for example, or adding layers to a poignant melody, which is a variation on a prominent theme. But in the truly impressive warhorses of the Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack, he employs as many of these techniques as he can to create truly stunning works that defy MIDI programming. I'm referring here to the classics "Main Theme of F.F.VII" and of course "One-Winged Angel". Both pieces are scored for full orchestra, giving them a sense of grandeur that is immediately evident on first listen. Orchestral crescendos and even actual changes in volume are used. Both include dramatic and striking melodies throughout. In the Main Theme's case, these motives are used throughout the soundtrack to create a sense of cohesion, whereas in "One-Winged Angel," Uematsu uses already established motives (specifically from "Those Chosen By the Planet") to great effect. But most of all, because of these tracks' exceptional length, Uematsu is able to fully develop them, adding changes of mood and orchestration within one loop. In sum, these two tracks are the epitome of what to do right in composing any piece of music, not just one using MIDI. It's simply a pity Uematsu couldn't expend this much effort on the whole soundtrack.

Summary

For those who consider sound quality the least of their worries and have skipped to this part of the review in frustration with my persistent mentioning of the matter, there's a lot to like on this album — particularly if you've already played through the game. Uematsu has a flair for strong, memorable motives that can transfer some of the game designers' hard work into the music. However, there are just as many tracks on the album that are almost completely trivial. Devoted listeners might find something to appreciate in every piece, but ultimately this soundtrack is neither Uematsu's best nor his most consistent work. And factoring the problem of the poor sound quality doesn't make things better. It's true that Uematsu has strived hard to work beyond the limits of MIDI programming, and accomplished some really great things while doing so. But despite his or anyone's best efforts 1997 technology is still from 1997, and that remains a persistent obstacle in the path to clarity and quintessence.



Album
8/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

Phillip Dupont

Overview

Final Fantasy VII just happened to be my first Final Fantasy game, and it didn't disappoint. Once I completed it, I searched online for anything related to this game. Before, I didn't even know Final Fantasy soundtracks existed, let alone this one. Yeah, you can tell I never really liked video game music until then. I found the soundtrack on Amazon, and immediately bought it. After enjoying the music in the game, I was excited to here the actual thing outside of the game.

Body

The actual track that you'll first hear in the game is "Opening ~ Bombing Mission." The track goes well with the FMV sequence, which then changes as the actual game starts. Most of the tracks on this first disc deal with Midgar, which is a city that has been brought down by the evil Shinra Company. They all have a industrial feel to it, like something you'd hear in a factory, or some type of work place. There's also many character themes on the disc, the most popular one being "Tifa's Theme." Although that particular track is long (5:06 to be exact), the theme remains a classic to all fans.

Sadly, only two battle themes feature on the first disc. "Fighting" is the normal battle theme, but it feels like something you'd hear in previous Final Fantasy titles. "Still More Fighting," however, is the boss battle theme, which combines the rock element along with the instrumental themes. Area themes on the first disc are well done, but don't quite measure up to the past tracks you'd hear in a NES or SNES Final Fantasy title. I'm not saying that the instrumentation is better in the past games, since it's not, but the actual melodies were better than they are now.

Moving on to the second disc, where you leave Midgar and hear the beautiful world map theme, also known as the "F.F.VII Main Theme." This piece really doesn't sound like a world theme, since they're usually fast-paced and march-like. I never really heard the full track until I picked up the soundtrack, due to the random battles that occurred every few seconds. The rest of the tracks on this second disc is mainly area themes, although you do hear the wonderful march which is "Rufus' Welcome Ceremony" and the fantastic boss battle that is "J-E-N-O-V-A." You do get three of the four Chocobo themes on this disc, but that's about it.

The third disc makes up four of the most memorable Final Fantasy tracks ever. The first one being "Cosmo Canyon" which has a tribal theme to it, making it one if not the only really good area theme on the entire soundtrack. "Those Chosen by the Planet," also known as Sephiroth's Theme, is the best character theme on the disc, in my opinion. It's dark, and fits Sephiroth's personality well. Cid is a pilot, and his own theme fits the flying genre well. "Cid's Theme" could possibly be one of the greatest tracks in the entire Final Fantasy series in some people's eyes. Finally, one of the best themes of all time. "Aerith's Theme" has a great woodwind/piano solo at the start, and it continues with one of the most memorable melodies that you'll ever hear.

The fourth and final disc covers the final part of the game, most tracks being either area or FMV pieces. It starts out with "Shinra Army Wages a Full-Scale Attack," which covers a battle as the soldiers fight their way up the mountain. However, this track also carries a march tone to it, giving the feel of the soldiers, while fighting, marching up the mountain at the same time. The list continues with a suspenseful track, "Weapon Raid," then the Highwind theme. From then on, the CD goes mainly into FMV sequences and area tracks. But then, the final dungeon theme comes into play. "Judgement Day" has a heroic feel to it, showing that Cloud and his party have finally reached their goal. "Jenova Absolute" and "The Birth of God" are the final boss battles, but once that's completed, there's only one more battle until you reach your main goal: Sephiroth.

Quite possibly the greatest final battle track in Final Fantasy's long history, "One Winged Angel" delivers a great melody. Starting off with a blasting brass fanfare, "One Winged Angel" is suspenseful. Once the actual theme gets going and the choir starts chanting, no one can not stop listening to this track. It remains one of the best tracks Nobuo Uematsu has ever composed. To top off a great soundtrack, the final two tracks accompany the last FMV sequence and the ending credits. It's not the best way to end a great soundtrack set, but it'll do for now.

Summary

In conclusion, the Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack is a nice CD set that goes well with the actual game. However, it will only please to those who have played and completed the game. If you're a Final Fantasy fan and you want to complete your soundtrack collection, pick this one up. I recommend it to all video game music listeners



Album
9/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

Chris McGuffin

Composed, Arranged & Produced by
Nobuo Uematsu

Sound Programmer: Minoru Akao
Sound Engineer: Eiji Nakamura
M.A. and Recording Engineer: Kenzi Nagashima
Sound Effects: Yoshitaka Hirota, Yuichiro Mori,
Mitsuhiro Iwadate and Yoshikunu Nakamura
Chorus: Soprano; Matsue Fukushi and Minae Fujisaki
Alto; Kuzuko Nakano and Saki Ono / Tenor; Toru Tabei and Daisuke Hara
Bass; Toshizumi Sakai and Masashi Hamauzu

Director: Kensuke Matsushita (DigiCube)
Mastering Engineer: Masaaki Kato (Sunrise Studio)

Art Direction: Tadashi Shimada (Banana Studio)
Design: Tadashi Shimada and Norie Kadokura (Banana Studio)

Sales Promotion: Saiko Fukui (DigiCube)
Project Supervisor: Tadashi Nomura (SQUARE)
Co-Executive Producer: Hirofumi Nakamura (DigiCube)
Executive Producers: Hisashi Suzuki (DigiCube)
Hirofumi Yokota (DigiCube)


Also available on iTunes $24.99.
Album was composed by Нобуо Уэмацу and was released on February 10, 1997. Soundtrack consists of 85 tracks tracks with duration over more than 4 hours. Album was released by DigiCube.

CD 1

1
Prelude
02:52
2
Opening ~ Bombing Mission
03:58
3
Mako Reactor
03:20
4
Anxious Heart
04:02
5
Tifa's Theme
05:06
6
Barret's Theme
03:28
7
Hurry!
02:30
8
Lurking in the Darkness
02:34
9
Shin-Ra Company
04:03
10
Those Who Fight
02:47
11
Fanfare
00:55
12
Flowers Blooming in the Church
05:00
13
Turks' Theme
02:20
14
Under the Rotten Pizza
03:23
15
Oppressed People
02:38
16
Honeybee Manor
03:53
17
Who...Are You?
01:24
18
The Don of the Slums
02:11
19
Shin-Ra Building Infiltration
03:49
20
Those Who Fight Further
03:33
21
Red XIII's Theme
01:29
22
Crazy Motorcycle
03:38
23
Feelings Held Close to the Heart
02:14

CD 2

1
F.F. VII Main Theme
06:30
2
On the Way of the Journey
03:44
3
Good Night, Until Tomorrow
00:10
4
On that Day, Five Years Ago
03:14
5
Ranch Boy
02:52
6
Waltz de Chocobo
00:34
7
Electric de Chocobo
04:03
8
Cinco de Chocobo
03:01
9
Chase the Man with the Black Mantle
03:05
10
Eagle Fort
04:01
11
Rufus's Welcoming Ceremony
02:15
12
It's Hard to Stand on Two Feet
03:32
13
Trail of Blood
04:13
14
J-E-N-O-V-A
02:33
15
Continue
00:37
16
Coast of the Sun
02:28
17
Mark of the Traitor
03:32
18
Coal Mining Town
03:01
19
Gold Saucer
01:58
20
Cait Sith's Theme
03:34
21
Sandy Exile Place
05:33

CD 3

1
Canyon of Falling Stars
03:36
2
Lifestream
03:37
3
The Great Warrior
03:24
4
Descendant of the Shinobi
02:46
5
The One Chosen by the Planet
03:17
6
The Nightmare's Beginning
02:59
7
Cid's Theme
03:11
8
Steal the Tiny Bronco!
01:16
9
Wutai
04:30
10
Thanks for the Materia
01:37
11
Place Chocobo
01:50
12
Fiddle de Chocobo
02:50
13
Scoooooore
00:48
14
Tango of Tears
00:50
15
Stage Debut
02:37
16
Words Drowned by Fireworks
02:51
17
Temple in the Sea of Trees
03:52
18
The Voice of the Planet Can Be Heard
03:41
19
Aerith's Theme
04:18
20
Snowbound
04:51
21
The Great Northern Cave
06:06
22
Reunion
03:34
23
Who...Am I?
01:38

CD 4

1
Shin-Ra Army Full-Scale Attack
02:58
2
Weapon Raid
02:52
3
The Highwind Takes to the Skies
03:35
4
Secrets Sleeping in the Deep Sea
04:17
5
Parochial Village
02:27
6
From the Abyss of Despair
04:16
7
On the Other Side of the Mountain
02:36
8
Hurry Up!
02:57
9
A Dream into Outer Space
02:50
10
Countdown Start
00:51
11
If You Open Your Heart
02:48
12
Mako Cannon Firing ~ Shin-Ra Explosion
01:34
13
The Last Day
04:08
14
Perfect Jenova
03:59
15
Birth of a God
04:12
16
One-Winged Angel
07:19
17
The Planet's Crisis
08:06
18
Staff Roll
06:52
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