Soul Calibur II Original Soundtrack

Soul Calibur II Original Soundtrack. Передняя обложка. Click to zoom.
Soul Calibur II Original Soundtrack
Передняя обложка
Composed by Asuka Sakai / Junichi Nakatsuru / Junichi Takagi / Rio Hamamoto / Ryuichi Takada / Yoshihito Yano
Published by DigiCube
Catalog number SSCX-10086~7
Release type Game Soundtrack - Official Release
Format 2 CD - 35 Tracks
Release date March 26, 2003
Duration 01:49:13
Genres
Rate the album!

Overview

Soul Calibur II had big shoes to fill from its critically acclaimed predecessor Soul Calibur. However both the game and the soundtrack fulfilled the high expectations placed upon them. Junichi Nakatsuru and Yoshihito Yano returned to compose the sequel and are joined by Asuka Sakai (Ridge Racer Type 4, Katamari Damacy), Rio Hamamoto (Tekken Tag Tournament, Beautiful Katamari Damacy), Ryuchi Takada (Ace Combat 6, We Love Katamari), and guest Junichi Takagi. The bulk of the compositions are from Nakatsuru with a little help from Yano, Sakai, and Hamamoto whereas Takada and Takagi only contribute one track each to the soundtrack. The soundtrack maintains the style of the original but exploits the higher sound quality to full effect in order to obtain a more realistic and potent orchestral sound.

Body

Nakatsuru is the main contributor to the soundtrack yet manages to maintain consistency in the quality of his pieces throughout. After a bit of a wobbly start with the slightly dull "History Unfolds", he produces a string of high quality tracks such as "Unwavering Resolve". The famous "Hubris" borrows from Soul Calibur's "Bloom and Harvest", although is at a slower pace. The epic "Maze of the Blade" slowly ups the tempo, adds new instruments, and introduces new motives to the mix as the track spirals towards its conclusion. It is definitely the highlight of the soundtrack and makes a welcome change to the underdeveloped tracks that plagued the Soul Calibur soundtrack. here is also a long version of "Path of Destiny" featuring essentially the same melody as "Going to Where the Wind Blows" from Soul Calibur. However, it is given more time to build intensity and grandeur as the heroic soars in its opulent orchestration, the improved sound quality also makes the track noticeably more enjoyable.

Yano only contributes four tracks this time around and they are of mixed quality. The stand out track is "Brave Sword, Braver Soul", which has a brilliant driving percussion part and a potent oriental-inspired melody creating a very heroic atmosphere. However, "Evil Reborn" is not so inspirational, it has intensity but lacks any real melody, being based predominantly on orchestral hits and urgent string passages. Sakai also contributes four tracks to the album, although most of his efforts were a little insubstantial in comparison to the other composers. Her main contribution is "Labyrinth of the Moonlight", which is another longer and more developed track similar to "Maze of the Blade". There a large array of interesting percussion which gives the track a unique atmosphere. "Ordinary Pain" and "Windshadow" have noticeably weaker sound quality which makes them stand out in the soundtrack. However, the fact that they have little memorable to them makes them some of the weakest contributions to the soundtrack.

Hamamoto only contributes three tracks, but they are all of good quality if perhaps not up to the stellar quality of some of Nakatsuru's contributions. "Guided by Wind" is an enjoyable track with a notable melody and a good amount of development adding some nice touches towards the end. "No Turning Back" opens with a quite charming harpsichord and organ melody. It maintains a calmer atmosphere than most of the tracks on the soundtrack yet has a quiet anxiety. "Sword of the Patriot" is graced with a wonderful piccolo part that dances over the top of the orchestra with its playful runs. Takada's "Nothing to Lose" is a decent effort from the composer with some interesting orchestral touches. There is a very contrasting and mellow B-section section that interestingly combines Uilean pipes and piano. Takagi's "The Noble Blade" is a brilliant, if short, guitar solo track that is virtuosic and yet enjoyable. It gives a nice contrast to the large orchestrations of most of the other tracks on the album.

Summary

Overall I believe this soundtrack to be a significant improvement on its predecessor. The main factor in this is the larger number of highlights — the longer and more developed tracks such as "Maze of the Blade" and "Labyrinth of the Moonlight" give the soundtrack stand out tracks that can provide enjoyment for longer periods than most other tracks. It also shows an improvement in the musicality of the soundtrack with more interesting percussion rhythms and modulations, especially from Nakatsuru. However, the soundtrack maintains the consistency that made the original Soul Calibur so enjoyable and, although it has its troughs, the peaks balance it out enough to make a soundtrack one of the most enjoyable you can lay your hands on. In game the soundtrack works just as well as its predecessor fitting in with the time period and packing enough energy in order to be a suitable fighting soundtrack. The Soul Calibur II Original Soundtrack is definitely a fulfilling and stirring experience so I highly recommend it.



Album
9/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

James Timperley

Overview

Since Soul Calibur II, BradyGames have released one disc soundtracks for the series' music within their Limited Edition Strategy Guides. The Soul Calibur II Limited Edition Strategy Guide Soundtrack is arguably the most successful in the line of albums since there were fewer themes to compile from the Soul Calibur II Original Soundtrack. In fact, they succeed in compiling all but two of the notable themes from the main soundtrack. Under Junichi Nakatsuru, the soundtrack maintains the style of Soul Calibur but exploits the higher sound quality to full effect in order to obtain a more realistic and potent orchestral sound.

Body

Nakatsuru is the main contributor to the soundtrack yet manages to maintain consistency in the quality of his pieces throughout. After a bit of a wobbly start with the slightly dull "History Unfolds", he produces a string of high quality tracks such as "Unwavering Resolve". The famous "Hubris" borrows from Soul Calibur's "Bloom and Harvest", although is at a slower pace. The epic "Maze of the Blade" slowly ups the tempo, adds new instruments, and introduces new motives to the mix as the track spirals towards its conclusion. It is definitely the highlight of the soundtrack and makes a welcome change to the underdeveloped tracks that plagued the Soul Calibur soundtrack. here is also a long version of "Path of Destiny" featuring essentially the same melody as "Going to Where the Wind Blows" from Soul Calibur. However, it is given more time to build intensity and grandeur as the heroic soars in its opulent orchestration, the improved sound quality also makes the track noticeably more enjoyable. Note that Nakatsuru's "Into the Whirlwind" is the only full composition not to be included here.

Yoshihito Yano only contributes four tracks this time around and they are of mixed quality. The stand out track is "Brave Sword, Braver Soul", which has a brilliant driving percussion part and a potent oriental-inspired melody creating a very heroic atmosphere. However, "Evil Reborn" is not so inspirational, it has intensity but lacks any real melody, being based predominantly on orchestral hits and urgent string passages. Asuka Sakai also contributes four tracks to the album, although most of his efforts were a little insubstantial in comparison to the other composers. Her main contribution is "Labyrinth of the Moonlight", which is another longer and more developed track similar to "Maze of the Blade". There a large array of interesting percussion which gives the track a unique atmosphere. "Ordinary Pain" and "Windshadow" have noticeably weaker sound quality which makes them stand out in the soundtrack. However, the fact that they have little memorable to them makes them some of the weakest contributions to the soundtrack.

Rio Hamamoto only contributes three tracks, but they are all of good quality if perhaps not up to the stellar quality of some of Nakatsuru's contributions. "Guided by Wind" is an enjoyable track with a notable melody and a good amount of development adding some nice touches towards the end. "No Turning Back" opens with a quite charming harpsichord and organ melody. It maintains a calmer atmosphere than most of the tracks on the soundtrack yet has a quiet anxiety. "Sword of the Patriot" is graced with a wonderful piccolo part that dances over the top of the orchestra with its playful runs. Ryuichi Takada's "Nothing to Lose" is a decent effort from the composer with some interesting orchestral touches. There is a very contrasting and mellow B-section section that interestingly combines Uilean pipes and piano. This time, however, Junichi Takagi's short but brilliant guitar solo "The Noble Blade" did not make it. It is one of two notable absences from the soundtrack.

Summary

The Soul Calibur II soundtrack is certainly an improvement on its predecessor, thanks to higher production values, more musical experimentation, and a large number of well-developed highlights. Compared to the full soundtrack, there is very little missing in the promotional release. A handful of short event and scenario themes at the end of each disc of the two disc soundtrack weren't included, but they're no loss, and the only significant absences are "Into the Whirlwind" and "The Noble Blade". That said, most tracks are shortened by about a minute compared to the full release and, although all the music is still here, this may bother those who prefer full loops. This BradyGames soundtrack is nevertheless ideal for the majority of people out there and only completists will find it insufficient.



Album
8/10

Music in game
0/10

Game
0/10

James Timperley

Album was composed by Asuka Sakai / Junichi Nakatsuru / Junichi Takagi / Rio Hamamoto / Ryuichi Takada / Yoshihito Yano and was released on March 26, 2003. Soundtrack consists of tracks with duration over more than hour. Album was released by DigiCube.

CD 1

1
Under the Star of Destiny
02:08
2
History Unfolds
01:11
3
Unwavering Resolve
04:18
4
Guided By Wind
03:58
5
Evil Reborn
03:38
6
Raise Thy Sword
03:31
7
Brave Sword, Braver Soul
03:42
8
Chasing Death
03:39
9
Destiny Awaits No One
03:45
10
No Turning Back
03:26
11
Eternal Struggle
03:35
12
Hubris
04:08
13
Confrontation
03:56
14
Sword of the Patriot
04:12
15
Ordinary Pain
03:40
16
If There Were Any Other Way
03:27
17
Nothing to Lose
03:30
18
Hellfire
04:00
19
The Battle Ends
00:38
20
Slave of Desire
00:37
21
Burning Soul
00:35
22
The Journey Continues
00:36
23
Path of Destiny
03:06

CD 2

1
Tales of Souls and Swords
01:48
2
Quest For Glory
03:20
3
Windshadow
02:44
4
Maze of the Blade
06:49
5
Labyrinth of Moonlight
05:38
6
Whispers of the Sword
01:05
7
Path of Destiny
05:27
8
Into the Whirlwind
02:53
9
Healing Winds
02:38
10
The Noble Blade
00:57
11
Healing Winds: Reprise
03:17
12
Hubris: Reprise
03:21
You can't post comments, you need to sign up and authorize. Or you can use one of these services

  STATISTICS
  • Album has no ratings. Be the first!
  • Page views: 24027
  • Album achieved 504 place in our Hall of Fame
  • 0 persons have this album in collection

  COVERS

Popuplar

Полицейский с Рублёвки. Новогодний беспредел 2 Музыка к сериалу
Death Stranding: Timefall (Original Music from the World of Death Stranding)
Bad Boys For Life Soundtrack
Borderlands 3 Original Game Soundtrack
First Christmas That I Loved You From the Netflix Film Let It Snow
Jumanji: The Next Level Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Mandalorian: Chapter 1 Original Score, The
Irishman Original Motion Picture Soundtrack, The
Бывшие Музыка к сериалу
Девушки Бывают Разные - из х\ф "Девушки Бывают Разные"